How To Avoid These Common New Hire Pitfalls

How To Avoid These Common New Hire Pitfalls

New Hire PitfallsThe interviews are over, the W4 is filled out and it’s your first day on a new job. Now’s the time to shine.

Your early days at a company set the tone for how your boss and coworkers perceive you and can have a lasting impact on your ability to advance.  

Unfortunately, many new hires fall into traps that can hurt their credibility and even jeopardize their prospects at the company. So what can you do to start off strong and gain the respect of your manager and coworkers? Here are some pitfalls to avoid.

Not asking for help

If you put on quite a show during the interview process, you probably feel like you need to prove to your manager that she made the right choice in picking you over other candidates. And in proving your worth, you might avoid asking for help to demonstrate your effectiveness.

This is common: many new hires are afraid to ask for help when facing a problem. Asking for help might reveal that they don’t (gasp!) know everything.

Newsflash—your boss doesn’t expect you to know everything from day one. Asking for help isn’t a display of weakness. It shows your new employer that you’re willing to do whatever it takes to become a valuable part of the team.

Asking for too much help

Although getting help when you really need it is a must, asking questions that you could’ve answered with independent research is lazy.

Companies need employees with critical thinking skills: people who, when faced with a problem, try to arrive at a solution by mapping their current knowledge onto new situations.

Of course, there are some processes or systems that you won’t be able to figure out on your own. Others you can look up on the company website or in training manuals. The trick is in knowing where that line falls in your company or on your particular project.

Before going to a coworker or supervisor with a question, try to find the answer on your own. If you still need to ask for help, explain what steps you took to solve the problem independently. That way the person helping you knows that you’re trying to work through the issue with minimal assistance.

Missing the big picture

In some companies, it can be hard to know how your specific role fits into the overall mission, especially when you’re at the bottom of the org chart. Ideally, you’d learn this during the onboarding process. Regardless, not knowing how your role benefits the bottom line can make your day to day activities seem pointless.

To remedy this, become familiar with your company’s mission and vision statements. Understand their products or services, even if selling or promoting them isn’t your direct responsibility. Whether you’re in accounting or customer service, understanding how you’re specifically making a difference can help you see the big picture and improve your performance.

Getting caught up in office drama

All offices have moods—some are positive and some are negative. And often, one or two people can set the tone for an entire department. If you find that you’ve been hired into a negative office environment, you must do everything you can to avoid the coworkers who are creating that negativity.

In order to make it through the day with your sanity intact, you must focus on doing your job and achieving your performance goals. If a few people continually spew negative comments or gossip about others, avoid them. If you can’t, try to steer conversations toward more positive subjects and avoid topics that tend to drift into negative territory. Do whatever it takes to remain positive. You don’t want to be associated with the office’s negative person or group. It not only hurts your prospects at the company, but it also makes each day a drag.

The first 90 days at a new job are a continuation of the interview process. Your manager and coworkers are still evaluating whether you’re a good fit for the position and the company. With a desire to learn and a willingness to work both independently and as part of the team, you can demonstrate to them that you were and are the right choice.

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