Browsed by
Month: April 2017

3 UD Students Embark on Important Internships

3 UD Students Embark on Important Internships

Three University of Dallas students are embarking on amazing internships this summer–two to Rome and one to Brussels. And they learned about these once-in-a-lifetime opportunities by reading emails from the Office of Personal Career Development.

Maureen O’Toole, Teresa Haney, Will McEvoy

Teresa Haney (Politics19) has an accepted a political internship with the Holy See in Rome. “I’ll be doing lots of research into things like the ties between the Vatican and other embassies and countries,” she said.

Maureen O’Toole (Politics ’19) has accepted an internship in political diplomacy with the Holy See. “I’ll be in meetings with diplomats, taking notes, writing updates and briefs, and sending reports back to Washington” she said. “And I’ll also get to make travel arrangements for visitors and attend events.”

Will McEvoy (Economics ‘19) will be a public affairs intern for NATO in Brussels. “I’ll be working at the U.S. Embassy to advocate on behalf of NATO to both European and American citizens. I’ll stay ahead of press briefings and update social media to that end.”

O’Toole said that she believed the Rome experience was one thing that made all of their applications competitive. “We’ve all studied abroad and we won’t be as overwhelmed by the experience,” she said.

McEvoy agreed. “My interviewer told me I was one of the only candidates who had visited more than two countries. I’ve been to twelve, many of them NATO countries, so I mentioned that it in my personal statement.” The person who ultimately hired McEvoy also told him that the style of his writing in his personal statement stood out. “She said it was not written like a typical research paper.”

Haney said she thinks her internship at the Vatican will help her discern if politics is right for her. “Attending UD has instilled lofty ideals in me about social justice,” she said. “I’m looking forward to discerning if public policy work will help me achieve those ideals.”

O’Toole said the internship in Rome is her dream job. “I’m interested in political journalism so being in Rome will help me discern if this is my path.”

McEvoy said he has always been interested in NATO as a way to promote peace and achieve the lofty ideals that O’Toole speaks of, albeit from a different perspective. He also said that although not being paid for the internship presents a challenge, it makes the experience all the more worthwhile. “I believe that voluntarily serving your country shows your commitment to your ideals. You have to make sacrifices in order to achieve your goals.”

Julie Jernigan, Director of UD’s Office of Personal Career Development, wants to remind students that there are other amazing internships available: “UD students are uniquely competitive for high-level and international positions. So read the emails we send you!”

For more information of internships or to make an appointment with a career counselor, click here.

UD Professors Address Human Dignity: Part Two

UD Professors Address Human Dignity: Part Two

This is the second post in a series based on the event “UD Interdisciplinary Celebration of Human Dignity,” held March 23, 2017.

How does the University of Dallas curriculum encourage us to live in community? A panel of UD professors addressed the question, joining a conversation with students, other faculty, staff and alumni about the call to preserve human dignity regardless of race, country of origin, gender, religion or beliefs.

Dr. John Norris, Associate Provost, introduced the panel and topic. “At UD, although we promote the search for truth, there are still prejudices and pride, both inside our community and out,” he said. “A guiding question, then, is how can we show humble respect for the viewpoint of the other without falling into the trap of a relativistic morality?” Norris said that each panel member would reflect on how they approach human dignity in their classrooms.

Dr. Robert Kuglemann

Dr. Robert Kuglemann, Professor of Psychology, reflected during his talk on our treatment of others in relation to ourselves. “Jung said that liberal arts provides sustenance to the soul,” Kuglemann said. “But that doesn’t lead us away from nationalistic egoism.”

Kuglemann said that Jung was concerned with a tendency to confuse the nation with the individual and that intense patriotism and collectivism that eclipses the individual brings about a separation of others who do not fit into the collective.

“Are we safe from collectivism?” Kuglemann asked. In answer, he acknowledged that at UD, there is a sense of superiority over people who are not here. “Sometimes we discount the opinions of others because of this feeling of being correct,” he said. This feeling of “rightness” is evident in that fact that what we can’t see in ourselves, we can easily see in others. “We’ll say about ourselves, ‘We’re fighting the good fight,’ but about others, ‘They are irrational,’” Kuglemann said.

In order to fight this kind of collectivist superiority, Kuglemann said that we must gain self-knowledge of our own motivations. “We must pay attention to what fascinates us,” he said. “Are we looking for stories that reinforce our beliefs, like violence in immigrant neighborhoods or terrorism? This preserves our feeling of our own innocence. We want to know that we’re ignorant of our own complicity with evil.”

For more information about OPCD or to register for events, click here.

OPCD Offers Free Online Career Assessment

OPCD Offers Free Online Career Assessment


Having trouble choosing a career or major? Need a little help finding some direction? According to Gaby Martin, Counselor in the University of Dallas’ Office of Personal Career Development, an online assessment might be right for you. “We offer UD students the Focus 2 Assessment free of charge,” she said. “It can help you decide where to start your research on majors and career choices.”

Focus 2 is an online career self-assessment system that will help you explore your values, interests, personality and skills, and their relation to possible majors and careers. It then suggests areas for you to explore based on your answers. “Your results in Focus 2 are based on data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics,” Martin said. “They survey people doing various jobs and then determine what personality traits they have.”

After viewing your results, the next step is to research the majors and careers that sound appealing to you. Martin says to research careers using the Bureau of Labor Statistics website, where you’ll find data on just about any job title. “The website lists salaries, the short and long term outlooks for that career, as well as what’s required to work in the field,” she said.

But Martin warns against taking the Focus 2 results as prescriptive. Their purpose is to get you thinking about possibilities, not to tie you to a particular career or major. “Taking Focus 2 is the beginning of an inwardly focused process that will help you articulate what’s important to you and and then explore how those values translate into a major and a possible career.”

For more information on Focus 2 or to speak with a career counselor, visit our website.

 

UD Students Excel At Sales Competiton

UD Students Excel At Sales Competiton

University of Dallas students Rachel Sullivan, Michael Dinh and Dominic Del Curto returned from Florida International University’s sales competition with a lot to be proud of. The national competition consisted of 3 rounds with progressing levels of difficulty. The UD team was the only team who moved through all 3 rounds without losing a single member. Members of the group received a University of Dallas Experience Award to offset the costs of attending the competition.

Dominic Del Curto, Rachel Sullivan, Michael Dinh

Sullivan placed first in her group during all three rounds of competition. Del Curto placed third in rounds one and two and first in round three. Dinh placed second in round one and third in rounds two and three.

All three members of the team said that their success was due to their preparation and the guidance of their mentor, Dr. Laura Munoz. “When we got there, we were really nervous,” Dinh said. “But then when we heard people talking, we realized how well-prepared we were compared to the other contestants.”

In order to mimic the actual sales process, competitors were placed in role play situations, during which they were videoed making a mock sales call. They were given research materials in advance and were expected to learn about not only about the product they would be selling, but also about the industry itself. This required research into the needs of potential clients as well as possible objections. “It was sometimes hard to know exactly what we should prepare ahead of time,” said Del Curto. “So we just did lots of research and lots of role-playing.”

Del Curto, Sullivan, Dinh, Dr. Laura Munoz

Sullivan said that the entire process of preparation and competition helped her realize that any career will require the skills learned in sales. “Everyone should take a sales class,” she said. “Anyone working with people needs these skills, like doctors working with their patients.”

Dinh echoed that thought. “I think I learned how to instill trust,” he said. “And I know in the future I might have to sell my boss or a coworker on my ideas and having these skills will help me do that.”

Del Curto said that the both his sales class and the competition taught him to actively listen. “I learned to probe and question and to try to understand the other person’s problems,” he said.

The competition also included a career fair, and Sullivan, a senior, was contacted for an interview by one of the participating companies. Dinh has accepted a position as Pricing Strategy and Analytics Intern with the Walt Disney Company after his graduation this May. Del Curto, a junior, has a summer internship with the Fund for American Studies in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Laura Munoz, the group’s coach, said she could not be more proud of them: “Having competed gives them an edge in their professional lives. Here at Gupta College of Business, we pride ourselves in engaging in experiential learning and the competition allows them to do so. They learned the professional selling process and skills needed and were able to analyze and articulate this knowledge as the competition evolved. The training and actual competition allowed them to get to know themselves better and equally important, gave them a huge affirmation that they are capable, confident and smart young professionals.”

The UD Experience (UDE) awards encourage students to engage in activities in which they will present themselves professionally in pursuit of their vocational goals. Speak with your advisor and consult the UD website for specific details about the application process.

 

UD Professors Address Human Dignity

UD Professors Address Human Dignity

This is the first post in a series based on the event “UD Interdisciplinary Celebration of Human Dignity,” held March 23, 2017.

How does the University of Dallas curriculum encourage us to live in community? A panel of UD professors addressed the question, joining a conversation with students, other faculty, staff and alumni about the call to preserve human dignity regardless of race, country of origin, gender, religion or beliefs.

Dr. John Norris, Associate Provost, introduced the panel and topic. “At UD, although we promote the search for truth, there are still prejudices and pride, both inside our community and out,” he said. “A guiding question, then, is how can we show humble respect for the viewpoint of the other without falling into the trap of a relativistic morality?” Norris said that each panel member would reflect on how they approach human dignity in their classrooms.

Dr. Eileen Gregory

Dr. Eileen Gregory, Professor of English, began her talk by acknowledging that it is the privilege of college campuses nationwide to reflect upon and discuss polarizing subjects, like immigration and refugees, that have surfaced a result of the extreme negativity of last year’s political campaign. “This kind of reflection cultivates in us a reflective life,” she said. “And reflection is our true work. We must learn that ideas have consequences.”

Gregory’s talk focused on welcoming the stranger, a foundational tenet of nearly all societies and religions and one that is reflected in the literature of UD’s Core Curriculum. “The notion of hospitality prohibiting the mistreatment of the stranger was protected by divine law for both the Greeks and the Jews,” she said. “It wasn’t just a matter of right, but the highest form of justice.”

But why was this hospitality so important to society? According to Gregory, to be pitiless to the stranger is to exhibit hubris in forgetting one’s own vulnerability. “The Odyssey is the great text of hospitality,” she said. “Characters reiterate again and again that if you violate the laws of hospitality, you are inhuman. Hospitality to strangers is a defining fundamental of humanity.”

The great literary works also show the poverty and vulnerability of the human condition, as well as our dependence on others. “We don’t like to imagine ourselves as dependent,” Gregory said. “Everything in our culture holds up self-sufficiency and imperviousness to feeling as the ultimate aim.” But although we would prefer to confront the world as if we are invulnerable, that self-sufficiency is an illusion. According to Gregory, this is reason for welcoming the stranger: to do is to acknowledge the precariousness of our existence and our true human fragility.

For more information about OPCD events or to RSVP, click here.